Fatigue

The world will change for the better when people decide they are sick and tired of being sick and tired of the way the world is, and decide to change themselves.          Sydney Madwed

 

I went through a period when my blood glucose counts were not well

controlled and my stress levels slightly higher than I would have liked, when

I would find it ever so easy to just sit down, feel comfortable, and I would

nod off. Trying to awaken was difficult, there was hardly any energy to keep

my eye lids open; I felt fatigued and exhausted – but not tired as in tired

through lack of sleep. I was foggy and groggy in the head.

 

A doctor’s consultation proved interesting, but not enlightening. Rather

than explore what may be causing this range of feelings and sensations, when

they happened during the day, how long they lasted, and for how long had

I had these experiences, the conversation went straight to “You are probably

not getting enough sleep.” No! I was getting enough sleep. I had been

diagnosed with sleep apnea a year earlier and now wore a less than flattering

air mask to bed. But no further discussion would be entertained.

 

So it got me to thinking – about fatigue, and areas that. had a holistic assessment been done, may have given cause for a different “diagnosis!”

 

So this is a plea to take fatigue or tiredness seriously. But not just occasional tiredness due to an occasional night's lack of sleep, we are talking here of a general feeling and experience of fatigue which lasts for days with no apparent reasoning. It could be an indicator of serious medical conditions meriting attention such as : -

 

 

Anaemia, or low red blood cell counts, can cause fatigue. If you’ve got anaemiait, it’s usually due to deficiency of iron, folic acid, or vitamin B-12, or to heavy menstrual bleeding in women (which results in iron deficiency).

 

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) ME and fibromyalgia are conditions which some doctors, mine included, will not discuss. Mine told me they were difficult tom disagnose and more difficult to treat.

Apart from the fact that isn’t true these days, it is no reason not to explore. Fatigue is the main symptom.

 

Diabetes – as someone with a diabetes diagnosis I knew that this can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. But none of this was discussed, even at my request.

 

High blood glucose makes your blood thick and sludgy (non-medical terms of course!) and slows your circulation so that cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need to function efficiently and effectively. Could this account for my regular nodding off, feeling, grogged and drugged?

 

Low sugar levels also cause fatigue, and so it is important to have your sugar levels tested, and monitored. When blood sugar is low, there is not enough energy for the cells to do their job. The fuel in the tank is low.

 

With high blood glucose, blood vessels get inflamed by the increase in sugar and so can cause fatigue.  Monocytes or white blood cells which play a role in immune system functioning, when high in count, enter the brain, causing fatigue.

 

Heart disease – you may never have had any sign before of heart disease but if you are finding things need more energy and oomph and you get tired after tasks that previously were plain-sailing, then a heart check-up should be on your list of priorities.

 

Infections can trigger fatigue and often we are unaware that we have an infection. Your body’s immune system takes take energy to fight infecting invaders and this can cause fatigue and raise blood sugar levels.  Urinary tract and “bladder” infections as well as dental and vaginal infections often have no immediate symptoms other than fatigue so again, it is always advisable to have fatigue checked out.

 

Low testosterone levels, especially in men and especially those with diabetes, can trigger regular tiredness.

 

Low thyroid (“hypothyroidism”) — although people with diabetes are more likely than others to have thyroid problems, if your thyroid level is low, you are likely to feel tired, sleepy, and depressed. Conventional thyroid tests are notoriously inaccurate so you may have to press to be retested.

 

 

There are many other medical, possible causes of fatigue, including:

 

Addison’s disease

Anorexia

Arthritis

Asthma

Cancers

Depression

Insomnia

Iron deficiency (without anemia)

Kidney disease

Liver disease

Malnutrition

Medicines such as sedatives or antidepressants

Multiple sclerosis

Narcolepsy

Nutrition (poor)

Obstructive sleep apnea

Parkinson’s disease

Persistent pain

Thyroid gland that's overactive or underactive

 

 

Metaphysical causes

 

Emotional state

 

Abandoned

Aloneness

Anger

Grieving and loss – of a loved one, career, lifestyle, health

Hatred

Isolated

Lack of belonging

Pointlessness

Reserved, timid, lacking confidence

Unsafe

Unworthy

 

 

 

Metaphysical treatments

 

Work on your negative, limiting beliefs – to feel worthy, connected, belonging, purposeful.

If you have genuinely been abandoned, how can you forgive, what now needs to happen to have you realise that was a significant past event BUT that you can feel belonging, included NOW? Are yo abandoning yourself? What can you do instead?

How can you combat aloneness? What can you do to move out and connect with other, even if it is via the internet if you are housebound? What hobbies and interests do you have?

What passions do you have and are you sharing these with the world?

What would make you feel more secure, safe?

What role might faith play?

Would training in assertiveness skills help with confidence?

 

 

Above all

 

Get persistent fatigue checked out and do not accept superficial answers.

 

Go prepared to your doctor. Have answers to the following questions at the ready :-

 

  1. How quickly do you go to sleep when you go to bed?

  2. How much sleep do you normally get?

  3. Is it quality sleep? Uninterrupted?

  4. Do you feel rested on waking?

  5. When did you become aware of needing to sleep during the day time?

  6. Is there a pattern to it? Eg

  7. Always after eating?

  8. Anytime you sit down?

  9. When you feel relaxed?

  10. Do you feel depressed or unmotivated at the same time?

  11. Do you feel refreshed after waking from a nod-off?

  12. If not, how do you describe how you feel – mentally, emotionally and physically,

  13. What is your weight?

  14. How much exercise do you get daily?

  15. How much water do you drink daily?

 

 


Remember always that Love changes everything, Love heals.

Speak your truth with love.

 

Love yourself, Love others, Love life.

 

Love is our natural state of being. It is where we come from, what we are made of, and the thing that we arrived on the planet to experience both in terms of receiving and offering.

 

To return to health, feeling alive and awake, then return to Love.

Other causes

 

Ageing

Caffeine

Dehydration

Excess refined carbohydrates –

switch to higher protein/fat,

lower-carbohydrate eating

Insufficient exercise, fresh air

Lack of sleep or poor sleep — awakened sleep pattern

Overweight / obesity

Shift work

Overworking – overdoing it (even on social things)

Stress – physical, emotional, psychological

Medication side effects -many drugs for diabetes, blood pressure, depression, pain, and other issues can cause fatigue. Read labels, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Beliefs

 

I feel alone

I feel / have been abandoned

It’s best to do nothing – that’s safer

It’s easier to give up / give in

It’s best to stay quiet

It’s safer not to speak up

Life’s hopeless

It’s no use

I have to prove myself

I will never be good enough

I want to not be here

I have held negative emotion for a long time – hatred, anger, grief, resentment etc

Feel on top of the world

 

Renew

     Refresh

          Return

                Revitalise

Thuroid dysfunction: Is there hope?
Thyroid dysfunction:
Is there hope?

© 2017,2018,2019,2020 by Andrew Hunter

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